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Media Literacy

Media Literacy for 2018: Four Moves and a Habit

Recently, I was reading an article about language and ideas that 2017 brought into our lives.  The piece cited Mike Caulfield, director of blended and networked learning at Washington State University in Vancouver, WA.  Caulfield explains, we teach close reading and analysis of elements, like tone, where, "'fact-checkers', get to the truth of an issue in 60 to 90 seconds."  How do they do it?

Civic reasoning in the time of a sophisticated internet.

Friends, 

We have often discussed the importance of teaching students about fake news, but I would like to take that conversation one step further with a discussion about civic reasoning.  I had the opportunity to read, The Challenge That’s Bigger Than Fake News and found the beginning statement powerful. “Determining whose behind information and whether its worthy of trust is more complex than a true false dichotomy.”

Can movies really teach history? and should we use movies in the classroom?

It's a staggering fact - students recall 50% more factual information when they read text and watch a movie, but people will remember the movie version of history - even when it's incorrect. When history is presented in a fictional narrative, it shapes the way we think about the past. A small research study brought familes together to discuss their historical understanding of the Vietnam war. Both parents and children relied on memories from the Tom Hanks movie Forrest Gump. 

Video Screenings for Science Instruction?

Did you know you could borrow standards aligned documentaries from PBS? Included in their vast library are lesson plans. Since October is Health Literacy Awareness, check out their list of documentaries related to health topics. 

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