Skip to main content

Assessment for AE Online Course Plans for VT, February 2016

Greetings!

Practitioners in Vermont are presently engaged in a facilitated LINCS online course that explores fundamental ideas of assessment for adult literacy learners. Here course participants will share their plans for applying what they have learned in the course with their learners.

We encourage you to explore the ideas and plans posted here and reply with comments, questions, experiences and ideas for supporting effective assessment in adult education.

Comments

Cindy J Holden's picture
First

This activity is designed for work with potential candidates who are in the goal-setting phase for a High School Completion Program contract to make explicit the outcomes recognized by the Adult Education System. The activity is intended to:

  • Establish an adult culture and context  for our work together
  • Support learner goal-setting
  • Generate a tailored checklist for learner tracking of achievement     

To see the Activity Planning Form and the Adult Education Outcomes Federal Report Form go HERE  These documents are in my assessments file cabinet.

 

Beverleeee's picture
First

Activity Description

In an early meeting of a new conversation course, I plan to use a revised version of Jane C. Miller’s “Our Language Goals / Our Learning Goals” worksheets with my students.  I plan to have group discussion around the parts of the worksheets and invite students to take a few minutes to complete them. I will then invite students to share their answers with the group & hand the worksheets in to me for future reference.

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

The purpose will be to help me determine topics of interest to my students as well as why they are interested—that is, what they hope to learn and be able to do with what they learn.

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

High-intermediate conversation class with adults who are non-native speakers of English.

Resources Needed

Worksheets for students to complete, which have portions for preferences on topics that are essentially related to civics (work, health, community, etc.)

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

By their engagement with lessons that follow

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

I can use the students’ responses from the worksheets, in which they will have indicated what they hope to learn and be able to do with what they have learned, to ask them later to assess the progress they will have made in those areas. I will offer them my own observations, but my idea is that students will evaluate their own progress—especially (I anticipate) around their level of confidence when speaking, their in-class participation including with interview-type activities (hopefully with guest speakers), their readiness and success in talking about various topics and with various people outside of class (such as neighbors, colleagues, supervisors, doctors, their children’s teachers, bankers, etc.), and their knowledge of our local community. But I’ll know more about their goals once the class begins, of course!

Patricia Petraro's picture
First

I wholeheartedly agree with students evaluating their own progress.  I want to expose my students to many experiences that will boost their confidence level when speaking.  Your strategy for exposing students to many diverse opportunities to converse can only serve to increase their fluency and confidence.  

Patricia Petraro's picture
First

The activity is designed for ESOL students with an overarching goal of English proficiency.  The activity will encompass just one goal within the overarching goal using the My Goals: Planning, Monitoring, and Assessing Worksheet.

The activity is intended to assist students is setting realistic and reachable goals with teacher guidance.   I will meet with students to discuss progress which will function as formative assessment. 

The activity is designed for ESOL students with an overarching goal of English proficiency.  The activity will encompass just one goal within the overarching goal using the My Goals: Planning, Monitoring, and Assessing Worksheet.

ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION - The activity is intended to assist students is setting realistic and reachable goals 

ACTIVITY PURPOSE - I want my ESOL students to self-assess.  They are to monitor their progress and ascertain if they have reached their goals.  They will reflect on whether they have set a realistic goal and on strategies that are more helpful than others in attaining their goals.  

CLASS DESCRIPTION - Adult Basic Education ESOL students 1:1

RESOURCES NEEDED - My Goals: Planning, Monitoring, Assessment Worksheet

EVALUATION - I will gauge the impact of the activity by first helping the students to fill in the goal sheet.  I will then present/discuss strategies for meeting the goal.  I will have students choose the strategies they feel are best for them to meet their goals

COMMUNICATING WITH STUDENTS - We will then meet at designated times to monitor progression of goals.  

 

 

 

 

Marie Cora's picture
One hundred

Activity Description

Developing Reading Skills

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

To understand the main points of a story.

To be able to read, comprehend and enjoy reading.

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

Intermediate readers.

Talk about genre.

Read books from an assortment of genres.

Discuss the main points.

Use an assortment of graphic organizers to show thought and understanding.

Allow students to choose their own books and feel comfortable in a library.

Resources Needed

Books.

White board to write questions and interesting points of view that students come up with.

Graphic organizers.

Library (can be a field trip.)

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

Gauge the impact of the activity by the tone and mood of each student.

Ask questions about their favorite part, have them reflect on and write a short summary.

Have individual reading conferences.

Graphic organizers.

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

Have the students keep track of all the books they read and at what level the books are.

Chris Hardy's picture
First

 

 

Activity Description

 

 

Task-based formative assessment development with staff.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

 

 

In order to give staff more tools to assess student understanding, we will brainstorm as a group and develop task-based assessments that are fun, engage the learners but at the same time provide useful information for staff to inform their instruction. Projects for math, reading and grammar will all be developed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

 

 

A morning session prior to staff meeting will be utilized to come up with engaging task-based assessments that not only engage learners, but get to the heart of what students are attempting to learn. This information will allow staff to re-direct their instruction as appropriate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources Needed

 

 

To be determined based on the ideas developed. However, there are budget resources available for whatever supplies might be needed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

 

 

Consensus on the activity developed will be the starting point. Evaluation after the assessment is carried out with students will help correct any weaknesses. The ultimate evaluation is when students are post-tested in the TABE or CASAS and the scores evaluated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

 

This will be determined based on the subject being taught, though I imagine that as a group we can create some guidelines.

 

Brian Kravitz's picture
First

 

Activity Description

 

 

 

Conducting historical research using primary sources

 

 

 

 

 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

 

 

To understand bias, even in primary sources

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

 

 

 

HSCP

 

 

 

 

 

Resources Needed

 

 

 

Internet

Questions regarding sources

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

 

 

  1. From the depth of their findings and ability to find bias
  2. Can they do it without scaffolding, or with decreased scaffolding?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

 

I have the luxury of  being 1-on-1, so it’s almost always orally.

Barb Croft's picture
First

 

Activity Description 

 

 

Goal setting activity… 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

 

 

To help the student discover what their goals are and how to get there so they can earn their diplomas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

 

 

Adults interested in earning their high school credential. These students are very close to "graduating" and have only a few classes to complete and they will have completed their requirements.  

 

 

 

 

 

Resources Needed

 

 

Goal setting forms, quiet spot to privately discuss possible goals and interests, set target dates, prioritize steps to getting there, perhaps discuss learning style of student, schedule for classes, perhaps set up a study time outside of class. Student to choose where to start, with what class or proficiency, check with the student as to how much time they can actually invest as they get started…ownership and realistic goal.  So the resources are a willing student, a student with interest in helping themselves and a belief and assurance that the trust to get to the goal is  or will be built with the teacher. An open mind and determination.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

 

 

Is the student making eye contact?  Are they asking questions?  Do they come back for their 2nd and/or 3rd sessions?  Was the first step of the goal/plan completed or was nothing done?  Are they passive or engaged? Are the students's goals realistic? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?) 

 

Are they getting work done? Are they contributing?  Regular one to one interview sessions to see how they are feeling about their work to get their input and feedback. Are they meeting their target dates? Is it reasonable to extend or change a target date? Is the student assuming responsibility for their progress or lack of?  Does a checklist of steps to reach goal have any checks? Opportunity to set smaller more short-term goals.  Opportunity to increase speed if desired and appropriate. What is getting easier for you? Do you see more student confidence? More ability to move forward independently.

 

mary worthington's picture
First

I like this because it comes down to the student making the decisions and feeling respected (find a quiet spot to privately discuss goals and interests.) The learner is making decisions and prioritizing. It sounds open with lots of discussion and is about discovery. Well done!

Barbara Keyes's picture
First

I like your idea Barb

Katherine Malley's picture
First

Lesson Plan

Activity:  Completion of goal setting worksheets followed by discussion with instructor

I want the student to review initial goals, reflect on progress he has made, re-assess these goals, and look further down the road to a new set of goals. I want the student to look beyond the present and into his future.

This is a mixed adult education class—some are doing high school completion, others are reviewing basic skills, once in a while I have an ESL student. Ages range from 16-50. The student is a 39 year old immigrant from Ecuador who has lived in the US for about 20 years.

Resources:  Goal setting worksheets from Toolkit resource: Personal Goals Checklist, Goal Setting Interview, and Steps to the Future—Setting Realistic Expectations

Evaluation: I have already done this activity. I gauged the impact by asking the student directly if he felt that the worksheets helped him to step back and see where he started (four months ago), specific progress he has made, and where he wants to be in terms of personal goals—5, 10, 20 years from now.  I could tell from his responses, our extended discussion, and his interest that it was a worthwhile exercise for him.

The student set several new goals that are measurable and realistic—improving his spelling and math skills and getting his high school diploma. In a month he will be assessed via a writing assignment in which he uses a mix of the words he has learned to spell and applies his understanding of typical spelling patterns. He will solve problems that require him to use the math skills he has been practicing. We will work together to set up specific learning goals for his journey to his high school diploma and both of us will assess his progress on a monthly basis.

 

Markus Vogt's picture
First

 

Activity Description

 

 

 

Student Self-Assessment of Goals for Daily Math Related Needs and Activities

 

 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

 

 

This tool is meant to raise student awareness of the ubiquitous presence of math related needs and activities in daily life. Whenever an opportunity presents itself to apply math, we all have a choice, We can either ignore them and hope that our decision won’t come back to hurt us (balancing checkbook, figuring tax and tip, tax returns), farm the chore out to someone else (often at a cost), or learn to comfortably do it ourselves.

It is my hope that students will choose the last option after identifying two or three everyday math needs using this tool.

 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

 

 

This tool can be used with individuals or groups. It is likely to find the largest population in need of it among NRS levels 1 through 4.

 

 

Resources Needed

 

 

A pre-assessment tool (perhaps TABE or CASAS), activity related study and practice materials (check book ledgers, tax return documents, calculators, percent worksheets based on finding 10%, etc.), a post assessment tool (opposite form of pre=assessment).

 

 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

 

 

Guide them through the study, watch them practice, listen to their conversations with peers and their questions for me, compare their pre-assessment to their post-assessment.

 

 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

 

They will know from their comfort level and their success rate in practicing the skills. I will go over pre-and post-assessments with them.

 

Tricia Musgrove's picture
First

Also working with several students in Math, who regularly say that they will never use any of this after they graduate, I very much like this idea and would like to work with you on implementing this tool with our students.

Jean Perry's picture
First

Activity Description

Incorporate the writing goals self-assessment into the Learning Strategies Curriculum for paragraph and essay writing.  Use it to bolster the first class, in which students need to find reasons to ‘buy in’ to the program.

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

Increased ‘buy-in’ from students, as well as ideas which hopefully interest them to look back to when they need topics for writing.

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

Students should be able to write complete sentences, including some complex sentences, as demonstrated by a pre-assessment or completion of the sentence-writing curriculum.

Resources Needed

Copies of the writing goals self-assessment with some ideas already on it, to help get them started, and plenty of space for them to add their own.

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

Do they have real-life goals for being able to write a paragraph or essay?

Were students able to get started more easily when it was time to write? Were they more motivated?

Fiona Cook's picture
First

Activity Description

As part of the process for setting personal learning goals, I would like to do the activity, Pulling Forward -- Pushing Back from the Adult Learner Goals Toolkit (p.35-36), with my students.

Activity Purpose (What result are you looking for?)

For my learners to gain an awareness of and articulate what factors help and/or hinder them in reaching their goals.  They will also think about and discuss ways they can overcome their barriers, or turn them into interim goals.

Class Description (Level and demographics)

Adult ELLs -- mixed levels and mixed cultural backgrounds.

Resources Needed

* Picture file images of different kinds of people working, studying, or homemaking.
* A "back-story" for one of the pictures as a model.
* Vocabulary words on index cards.
* Photocopies on colored paper of the Pulling Forward -- Pushing Back form.

Evaluation (How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

Each student will have managed to identify 3-6 things which motivate them to work towards their personal goals and 3-6 barriers to their learning.  They will  have filled these in on the form.  We will then discuss strategies they can develop to deal with their barriers and/or turn them into interim goals.  

Communicating with Students (How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

This kind of self-awareness about their motivation and learning can be very valuable to students and help them to realize how to maintain their interest and energy levels in the face of difficulties they may face.  I will check in periodically with the students on how they are doing with overcoming their "barriers".  I will ask students to share their "success stories" with each other.  

 

Beverleeee's picture
First

Fiona, this looks like a deeply worthwhile topic with adult ELLs. I very much appreciate how you have planned in the scaffolding, which I find very inspiring. Since the barriers to learning are always an issue for adults, I completely agree that having an open and frank conversation about how each student may be able to work with or around those barriers is a rich topic to explore. It would even make a great conversation topic, as it is both inspiring and personally connecting for the students with each other (realizing that they may share common barriers & have ideas to offer each other) as well as with the teacher. Thank you!

Wendelyn Bolles's picture
First

 

Activity Description

 

 

Math Life Skills Self-Assessment and Goal Setting

 

 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

 

 

  • Raise student awareness of relationship between math skills and real life applications.
  • Encourage students to become comfortable using math in their daily lives
  • Help students track and recognize their progress in math

 

 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

 

 

  • Math learning labs where students work independently at their own level and at their own pace seeking assistance and support from instructor, volunteer tutors and each other when needed.
  • NRS levels 2-4
  • Ages 16 – 50
  • Goals: Preparation for HSCP/GED, basic skills improvement for work or training programs

 

Resources Needed

 

 

  • Math Goals Self-Assessment from the Adult Learner Goals Toolkit. I would modify this document to include financial literacy and math goals from the Personal Goals Checklist found in the Adult Learner Goals Toolkit, and possibly items from the CASAS Competencies list.
  • Colored paper!

 

 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

 

 

  • Have the students complete the Math Goals Self-Assessment periodically, maybe once a month or every two months, and look for progress.
  • Talk with students about how they are using math in their lives.
  • Look for increased motivation for those (mostly younger) students who do not see a reason for learning math.

 

 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

 

  • The student and an instructor will review the Math Goals Self-Assessment together.
  • The student should also see improvements in their ability to actually perform life skills math tasks.
mary worthington's picture
First

Activity Description

Purpose of this activity is to inform the student and answer the question, “what is going to create real progress?”

Start by making a list of five things (texts) with which the student frequently comes into contact that need to be read. They should be practical and within the realm of possible improvement.

Rubric created by both learner and instructor. This would require discussion about what will make the student a better reader (knowledge of syllable types, phonemic awareness, reading research, etc.) It would ultimately give the student information about what is required to improve reading and spelling in the context of creating the rubric.

Activity Purpose

Participation of learner in creating a document that can be used to assess progress in reading and can also be used as a teaching tool (what will help me become a better reader?) We want to see movement along a continuum. The rubric will also be used to gauge how the learner feels he/she is doing, possibly a way to measure anecdotal evidence.

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

Adult emerging reader

Resources Needed

Stop watch, calculator. Information that would help in understanding what needs to be measured when charting progress in reading. What does progress look like? What is the research? A chart/rubric. Sight word cards, word lists, practice texts.

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

Measurement of speed and accuracy. Does the learner see/feel a difference in reading in his/her own life? What is the anecdotal evidence? Does the student feel progress is being made? Fluency measurement of one of the items from the list. Is student able to read it with adequate fluency (60 words correct per minute at 95%) so that he/she understands what’s being read? Is the student able to answer questions about the text?

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

Charting class to class progress measuring fluency in all six syllable types. Doing a once a month fluency check with student’s pre selected text. 

dplumb's picture
First

 

 

Activity Description

 

 

Students will compile a learner portfolio of some kind.  The form will depend upon the student’s goals, but will probably be in the form of a binder.  Student will periodically choose examples of work to include in the portfolio.  Computer students will be learning to save and organize materials digitally.

 

 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

 

 

The purpose of the portfolio will be to allow the student to recognize his growth even if the steps are small.  This could lead to further perseverance on the part of the student.  It could also allow the student to see connections among and within domains of learning.

The work can also be evidence of work for stakeholders as well. 

I, as the teacher, will also see growth and even recognize some gaps.  The binder can also lead to some creativity on the part of the student as he creates his own record.

 

 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

 

 

I teach reading, writing, and math NRS levels 1-4 as well as beginning computer and Word skills.  Ages range from 16-65 at present.

Some classes are classes of about 6, some learning labs, and some one-on-one,

 

Resources Needed

 

Quality activities and materials for students to complete.

Binders to collect work.

Goal sheets of some type and something to act as checklist for student.

 

 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

 

 

Formative assessment as students give feedback when they see their growth.

Increase in skills as they are more motivated.

Eventual skill gain in some type of summative assessment

 

 

 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

 

The students will see their growth as they recognize the increased complexity of their work. Conversely, if they haven’t been engaging there won’t be much work to show. This may motivate them to start working.

This could be part of developing self-regulation.

 

Elaine DeForge's picture
First

Activity Description

Students will complete a portfolio of their work on a topic area and put it in a binder.  Students will also complete a reflective essay and presentation regarding their work.

Activity Purpose

The students will recognize their progress while organizing their binder, reflective essay, and presentation. This progress should encourage the student as well.

Class Description

NRS levels 1-6; ages range from 16-60; single, married, w/wo children

Resources Needed

activities/projects; binders

Evaluation

The portfolio, reflective essay, and presentation should demonstrate progress.  There could be skill gains on summative assessments.

Communicating with Students

There is frequent communication between students and instructor throughout (feedback).  The students will recognize their progress as they construct their portfolio, reflective essay, and presentation.

 

Dan's picture
First

Activity Description:  Initial goal-setting and initial/end-of-course self-assessment activity designed for employees in a work-related ELL class at a manufacturing facility.  On Day One, the class will generate a list of important tasks that rely on English.  The instructor will help students brainstorm a list of important tasks that use English (a) on the job, and (b) outside of work.  After class, the instructor will compile the list of tasks, adding as needed, and use the list to create a Goals Self-Assessment.  This self-assessment would be completed by students on Day Two, and then again at the end of the course.  I will adapt the Goals Self-Assessment from the Adult Learner Toolkit (p. 16-19) to self-assess employees’ confidence and experience with community and work-related tasks from the Day One brainstorm, adding as necessary (e.g. calling in sick, reading a pay stub, talking to a supervisor, giving directions, going to the bank, telling the time).  The students would mark each task with one of the following:  (a) Can do, (b) Can do with help, (c) Can’t do, (d) Want to do now, (e) Want to do later, (f) Not important for me.  

Activity Purpose:  The purpose of the activity is to identify student needs and goals for using language on the job and outside of work.  It is also designed to get student involvement in developing the course curriculum to ensure that student goals inform instruction.  

Class Description: This is designed for an 18-week class of 8-12 English language learners who are ESOL NRS 2-3 (Low/High Beginners).  Students are employees at a manufacturing facility, taking an ELL class that integrates general English skill-building with workplace tasks and vocabulary.  Students are New Americans from a range of countries (e.g. Burma, Somalia, Nepal, Bhutan, China, Vietnam).   

Resources Needed: I will need an adapted Goals Self-Assessment checklist for each student.  I will also need chart paper (or a whiteboard) to record students’ list of work-related and home-related tasks.  

Evaluation: I would use this Goals Self-Assessment at the beginning of the 18-week class as a goal-setting tool for students and as a diagnostic assessment for the instructor to identify what students can and can’t do prior to instruction.  This would help inform the course content.  I would then use the same Self-Assessment at the end of the 18-week class to gauge student progress toward these goals and help students set new goals to continue outside of class.  Students could then reflect as a group to discuss the usefulness of this activity for their own learning.

Communicating with Students: Students would be able to compare their initial Self-Assessment with their end-of-course Self-Assessment.  They could check for any movement—e.g. from “Can’t Do” to “Can Do,” or “Not Important” to “Want to Know Later.”  It might be useful for students to compare the results and then synthesize their feelings or observations in a piece of writing or oral interview to note improvements or changes.

 

llittler's picture
First

Lynn Littler

 

Activity Description

 

 

  • Goal-setting activity for EFF Standard Take Responsibility for Learning.
  • Initially ask students what Take Responsibility for Learning (TRL) means to them and why it’s important.
  • Ask students to reflect on past actions and practices associated with this standard.

 

 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

 

 

  • Identify and use strategies to help students reach their goals and to monitor their progress toward those goals.
  • Students will ultimately see that learning is an independent endeavor as much as a partnership with the instructor.

 

 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

 

 

  • 1:1 with all HSCP students ages 16 and up.

 

 

 

 

Resources Needed

 

 

  • TRL Rubric to articulate expectations and clear criteria.
  • Achievement and Effort Rubric to provide feedback and recognition.

 

 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

 

 

  • Students are actively involved in the process.
  • By completing self-assessments, students will develop an understanding of themselves as learners and are able to articulate their strengths and needs.
  • Students will identify why their new learning is important and how to apply or transfer their acquired knowledge and skills in other areas of their lives.

 

 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

 

 

  • Students will self-regulate by taking ownership of their learning and setting their own academic goals.
  • Students will develop strategies to meet these goals.
  • Students are intrinsically motivated to be consistently involved in self-assessment and reflection on their own academic performance.

 

mary worthington's picture
First

"Learning is an independent endeavor as much as a partnership with the instructor." YES!

Tricia Musgrove's picture
First

I chose to work with the strategies I liked from Topic 3, "Getting Positive" and "Clearing the Brain". I'm not sure of exactly the specific activities I will do, if any, but I do plan to work with my students more on these concepts. So many of our students feel like they just aren't capable of doing well on assessments, to begin with, because of past negative experiences. Really, they are all very bright, we just have to find a way to pull that out of them. Unfortunately, because of those early negative experiences, they develop an overall negative attitude toward anything to do with learning, and sometimes even life in general. When you keep getting knocked down, it's hard to believe anything but the negative. Somehow, I want to work on that positivity with my students and help them get that negative stuff out of their heads. Specifically, I don't know what I will do yet other than what I already am doing, and I will just continue to do more of it. I sit with my students and talk to them and let them talk to me. Sometimes they just need someone to listen. And then I encourage them in whatever they are attempting to do, letting them know that I am there to help get them through it. I will continue to do that along with working on finding activities to supplement my encouragement wherever necessary.

 

 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

 

 

Helping my High School Completion Program students feel more positive so they can excel at learning and in life.

 

 

 

 

 

Activity Description

 

 

I don’t have a specific plan or program that I use to help my students in this area. I have found during my time working for this agency (10+ years) that one reason my students like working with me is because I am a good listener. Sometimes, spending time “venting” before getting down to school work is exactly what they need to do in order to clear their heads and be in a place that is ready for work. And while we are talking, I also encourage them and try to help them see things in a more positive way, whether it has to do with something going on in their personal lives or something about the work they are doing. So many of my students have been knocked down in life and in school over and over again, and they end up developing a negative attitude toward everything in their lives. If I can help them get that negative stuff out of their heads and help give them a more positive outlook, in whatever forms that may take (talking, giving them activities, daily reinforcement), that’s what I want to do. To me, helping my students earn their high school diplomas is only one part of my job. Helping to create productive and excited young adults who are looking forward to getting out in the world and making their contributions to it is a much larger part of what I do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

 

 

 

Students ages 16 and above from the Northeast Kingdom who want to earn a high school diploma.

 

 

 

 

 

Resources Needed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

 

 

By seeing successes in their school work, especially in the content areas they had previously struggled in. Also by seeing a change in their attitudes about their abilities and what they can and cannot do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

 

 

I am always communicating with my students, whether we’re working on school work or just talking about life in general, and I am encouraging them the whole time as well, working towards those positive outcomes. My students always know where they stand with me.

Hayley Shriner's picture
First

 

 

Activity Description

 

 

I will review the Career Interest Survey that we use with students as they complete the program to see if it aligns completely with the EFF Goal Setting form. Many of the questions are the same—and I find them useful.

 

 

 

 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

 

 

To help students make a plan for their future after they complete high school. To have a document in hand with ‘next steps’ and realistic expectations regarding educational investment, career growth, skills needed, etc.

 

 

 

 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

 

 

Usually when working on this activity, I work one to one with students who have completed the other components of their High School Completion Plan.

 

 

 

 

 

Resources Needed

 

 

EFF Goal setting sheet, Career Interest Survey

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

 

 

  1. Students’ ability to articulate own goals: confidence in ability to pursue goals.
  2. Students’ completion of plan with realistic information.
  3. Students’ pursuit and attainment of goals.

 

 

 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

 

Unfortunately, because this activity is done at the end of the program, not all students will keep in touch regarding whether or not they follow through with these goals.

 

Nancy McFadden's picture
First

 

Activity Description 
     
Reading and writing class and independent study for adult learners: ELA review with a focus on strengthening skills in grammar and writing for high school and beyond.
 
Activity Purpose
(What result are you looking for?)
    
•    Improve quantitative and qualitative ELA results in preparation for TABE NRS requirements for High School Completion Program and for the GED test. 
•    College entrance exam preparation for Accuplacer, TOEFL and similar.
•    Preparation for other career-related certification programs and entrance exams such as ASVAB.
•    Review and reflection on specific goals as outlined by each student at the beginning of the class.

Class Description
(Level and demographics)
    
•    Students meet in 1.5 hour class once per week and independently in lab or at home on assignments 2+ hours per week.
•    Pre-assessed at NRS levels 3-6 in the previous 6 months. 
•    Ages 16.5+ with at least 1 year of high school.
•    Native or fluent English speakers.

Resources Needed
     
•    Contemporary’s Achieving TABE Success in Language
•    Townsend Press’ English Essentials and Clear Thinking and Writing
•    “My Goal Setting Interview” from the Adult Learner Goals Toolkit
•    “Our Language Goals – Our Learning Goals” from toolkit modified to target native English speakers.

Evaluation
(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)
     
•    Before class begins assess students using TABE pre-test Individual Diagnostic Profile. 
•    Post-test using appropriate TABE survey which provides summative assessment of achievement.
•    Similar process as above when using CASAS as assessment tool.
•    Periodic exercises in class in which students construct (or deconstruct) sentences and grammar examples as a group in order to gauge student skills and progress. (Formative assessment)

Communicating with Students
(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?) 
•    Students will self-correct their work throughout the course using answer keys from text books. Individual or group discussion on problem areas will help to clarify and validate students’ intermediate progress.
•    Share TABE (or CASAS) post-test results with individual students in interviews both during and at end of course.
•    Discuss “what’s next” as a part of the final interview.

mary worthington's picture
First

I really like the self correct part of this.

Barbara Keyes's picture
First

 

 

Activity Description

 

 

 

Computation practice tests/reflective essays, rubrics, and discussions after review of basic concepts of subject material. This could be math, English, science, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

 

 

The purpose is to see how well students have strengthened their skills in a particular subject area.

 

 

 

 

 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

 

 

Multi-level open classroom; teenagers to older adults.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources Needed

 

 

Vocabulary, guides, computation worksheets, and rubrics

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

 

 

Students will discuss and reflect on these activities with the instructor

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

 

Students’ reflection pieces, computation tests, and discussion with the instructor will provide them as well as the instructor with visuals and insight as to how well they have understood the basic concepts of a certain subject as they move towards their short and long term goals..  

 

Randy Cole's picture
First

 

Activity Description

 

 

 

 

How to do best on standardized tests (especially TABE)

 

 

 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

 

 

Purpose of this activity is to give students an array of test taking tools and ideas to realize the benefits of standardized tests, reduce anxiety, and prepare them to have confidence going into the testing situation.

 

 

 

 

 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

 

 

Intermediate Math Class of 5 students that are at the point of achieving a level 5 or 6 on the TABE Math Assessment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources Needed

 

 

Practice test format, such as post assessment in TABE Math Book, Calculator hi liters . Materials that correspond to items on test.-especially applied word problem questions and graphic material like grids and number lines.

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

 

 

Test taking strategies  should be an ongoing part of the math curriculum and begin very early in the students classroom instruction..Methods such as reviewing allotted time, recognizing the wrong answers and eliminating them, scanning the entire test and using graphics and pictures should be a constant practice by all students all the time- not just for the test. By having these tools, along with many opportunities to practice, students should not only do better on assessments but retain methods they can use for other educational components.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

 

Ultimately the proof will be in the assessment results. Did the student feel positive going into the assessment. Did they use the time properly? Did they complete all questions? These areas will have been previously addressed. Ideally students will be able to verbalize their feeling about their preparation abd how to best continue forward.

 

Joe Przyperhart's picture
First

Randy,

I'll be interested in hearing how this goes with your students. I suspect many students who tell us they are no good at taking tests have just never been taught good test taking strategies. And really, good test taking strategies boil down to a lot of good basic skills: time management, the ability to prioritize, basic problem solving, locating information, etc. I wonder if students learning these skill in the context of test taking will be able to transfer them to other situations.

Joe

Christina Fabiano's picture
First

Activity Description

Task-based formative assessment for evaluating understanding of a grammar structure (adjective clauses - subject form). Students will write a person, place, or thing (nouns) on one piece of paper and a description of that person, place, or thing (adjective clauses) on another piece of paper. (e.g. "Oprah" on one piece of paper and "A woman who is on TV" on another). After many of these pairs have been created, the teacher mixes them up and redistributes them. One by one, the students say aloud sentences based on their adjective clauses in order to find their match.

For example:

Student 1(has adjective clause tile): "I'm looking for a woman who is on TV."

Student 2 (has matching noun tile): Oprah is a woman who is on TV. 

After all students find their matches, they will write sentences with adjective clauses (with a topic of their own choosing). This activity tests speaking and writing and also listening. 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

I want to see that the students are able to create and use adjective clauses in both their speaking and writing. Many students will avoid using adjective clauses and speak in short, simple sentences. It is my hope that this activity will help them string clauses together in order to give their speaking and writing some detail and depth. 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

Low-Intermediate/Intermediate ELLs. Diverse group of native languages.

Resources Needed

Note cards or small rectangles of paper (about 6 rectangles per student), pens or pencils, lined paper. 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

I’ll evaluate students by listening to their sentences. Are they putting the relative pronouns in the correct place? Are they even using adjective clauses? It can be so easy to evade using them in general, but they’re so important for speaking and writing clarity. The tile activity will help me to evaluate their speaking abilities and the follow up writing activity will help me see if they are able to generate sentences with adjective clauses. 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

I will correct all of their written sentences and I will more than likely follow this up with a short worksheet that will test their knowledge. This information will also be on their unit test. 

Alyssa Gagne's picture
First

Activity Description: This activity will focus on vocabulary acquisition in an ABE classroom setting. The students will skim an article on their own and underline words they do not know.  I will note which words students are underlining as I circle the room during silent skimming time.  As a class, we will make a word list on the board and discuss the unknown words for clarity.  We will read the article together as a group while paying careful attention to how the new words are used in the text. 

Activity Purpose: The purpose of this activity will be to assess the level of understanding of vocabulary present in an course-related article. The article will address a topic for discussion during the class and will relate to the curriculum.

Class Description: The class consists of ABE students who are working to strengthen their reading and vocabulary. The TABE assessment scores range from NRS 2-4. The class meets twice a week for 2 hours each time. 

Resources Needed: article, pencils/pens, highlighters (if wanted for vocabulary words), whiteboard, dry erase markers, 

Evaluation:  I will make brief notes about students who are underlining many words in the text.  I will also use a checklist to make notes on how people read the text aloud (if they feel comfortable reading out loud) Based on practices noted in the ELL classroom experience we watched in Week 4, I will use a visual check-in to see how students are understanding the text and vocabulary. Using a thumbs-up/thumbs-down/halfway sign to communicate feelings regarding the material.

Communicating with Students: I will communicate that I am looking to see which words are unknown and how we can increase our knowledge of the words. Students will write down the definitions of the words on our list as a class. The words will be integrated in the next class's opening activity. They will see progress in their understanding when they are able to use the words more comfortably in class assignments and conversations.

Charlotte Bill's picture
First
Activity Description Activity will provide opportunity for students to identify, consider, and prioritize more specific goals than they typically do during the intake and goal-setting process.

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

To improve goal setting with students

To identity and clarify more specific goals within the context of broad goals

To provide a more specific focus for instruction

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

To be used with all students, either individually or in small groups, at any Adult Basic Education, Adult Secondary Education, or Adult English Language Learner  level (with appropriate adaptations depending on audience)
Resources Needed

Copies of “Goal Self-Assessments – Reading, Writing, and/or Math” (pages 17, 18 and/or 19) and

“Personal Goals Assessment” (pages 21-22)

 

(from the Adult Learner Goals Toolkit, compiled by the Colorado Department of Education  CARE  AEFLA, 2004

http://www.cde.state.co.us/sites/default/files/documents/cdeadult/download/pdf/goalstoolkitr.pdf)

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

I will use a revised version of the Classroom Critical Incident Questionnaire (CCIQ), with questions in a conversation or oral interview, for example:

What aspect of using the checklist(s) for setting goals was most useful?

(How or why was it useful?)

What aspect of using the checklist(s) for setting goals was least useful?

(How or why was it not useful?)

What aspect of using the checklist(s) for setting goals was most puzzling or confusing?

What did you learn about your goals?

What surprised you the most?

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

Through completion of the evaluation piece (previous section) student will articulate own sense of effectiveness of goal clarification.

 

llittler's picture
First

Hi Charlotte,

The topic you've chosen is an area that I would like to improve upon. Your plan will help me move forward more quickly on this very important topic. From comments I've read, it looks as though Joanne, Joe, you and I clearly see the value in using a revised version of CCIQ with our students. Please know that your insightful and thought-provoking posts, in my opinion, are always worth reading more than once. As always, thank you. Lynn 

 

 

Charlotte Bill's picture
First

Thank you, Lynn. One of the things I find interesting about the CCIQ is that it reminds me of some of the reflective interviews that Sally G. had incorporated into our old Adult Diploma Program (ADP) materials. I have continued to find inspiration from some of those interviews, revising and adapting the questions to use with High School Completion Program (HSCP) students as part of the summative assessment piece. For example, one of my students recently completed a workshop in experimental photography at a local arts non-profit organization. She brought in an amazing portfolio of her work, and she is writing up a report on the various processes she learned, but we will also complete a questionnaire which will be somewhat of a hybrid of CCIQ and one of Sally's reflective interviews. Since making the transition from the ADP to the HSCP, I've used these interviews regularly and have found them valuable. Thanks again for your comment. It's been so nice to have been in this course with you! Be well, Charlotte

Joe Przyperhart's picture
First

 

Activity Description

 

I supervise and do not generally instruct students myself. So, I would like to use the Classroom Critical Incident Questionnaire as a tool to help staff reflect on trainings and meetings. I'm thinking it might be especially useful for our annual all staff meeting. I also think it might work well as a think-pair-share to wrap up a meeting or training activity.

 

 

 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

 

I am hoping to both reinforce ideas from our meeting and trainings and to get feedback from staff so I can make our meetings and trainings as effective as possible.

 

 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

 

 

Vermont Adult Learning staff of all levels.

 

 

 

 

 

Resources Needed

 

Just the CCIQ form modified to fit the particular meeting or training.

 

 

 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

 

 

If using this tool is effective, staff will come away from training and meetings with a better understanding of the topics covered and our meetings/trainings will steadily become more effective as we incorporate feedback from the reflections. How I gauge those things is a tougher question. Ultimately it would show as improvements in student outcomes, better student retention, more efficient and effective systems, etc.

 

 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

 

 

We are currently in the process of revising our staff evaluation system and I think the new process will give plenty of opportunities throughout the year for that sort of feedback.

Casey Lussier's picture
First

I was inspired by the New Horizons video to try the timeline activity with a student who is focusing on reading. The student is a middle-aged female student with whom I work one-on-one. Her NRS reading level is 3. The purpose of the activity is to check her reading comprehension of the novel we are reading together. This novel, Lyddie by Katherine Paterson, is particularly suited for this activity because it is historical fiction that follows the life of a teenage girl, so it will be easy to isolate important event and ask the student to arrange the chronologically. I will construct a large timeline and hang it in the classroom and create photos/illustrations that match the events of the book. I will be checking to see whether the events are placed in order. If the student exhibits confusion, I will try to tease out the source of the misunderstandings through discussion. I think my student will enjoy this activity more than ordinary discussion and questions.

Joanne Vyce's picture
First

In this activity students will identify real and perceived barriers to reaching their goals, as well as their own personal motivators. Using the “Pulling Forward – Pushing Backward” activity sheet from the Adult Learner Goals Toolkit, students will identify those factors that inhibit their success and those which motivate them to reach their goals. They will then have the opportunity to reflect and use the same graphic organizer to turn their roadblocks into action steps. Because this will not occur in a class setting, individual students will use informal writing to reflect on their process and have the opportunity to read the reflections of others. Having articulated short term goals, students will reflect,verbally and in writing, on the changes they have made and the effectiveness of this activity. 

 

Ed Pirie's picture
First

Hi, I recently have been part of the AEL Assessment on line course with Marie Cora. I like to think of myself as a veteran adult educator (currently in my 19th year here in Vermont). As part of the above course, a reading was shared taken from the Spring, 2004, Volume 16, "Adventures in Assessment" published by SABES. The reading is "Integrating Goal Setting into Instructional Practice" and can be found on page 25. The reading was co-authored by staff at The Center for New Americans with multiple sites in western Massachusetts. This piece really resonated with me. I have seen in practice so many times the high importance of good goal setting and the need to use goal setting to drive the learning plan and instructional process. This article again reinforces the need for strong student collaboration in this process as well as the desired student persistence and retention. I urge all of my colleagues to find this article and use the encouragement provided in your work as an adult educator. I am sharing a planning tool below with my thinking about the process of using goal setting as the heart of the instructional process.

 

Activity Description

 

 

Using goal setting to guide and inform instructional practice (based on the reading, “Integrating Goal Setting into Instructional Practice;” By the Staff at the Center for New Americans, Massachusetts, taken from “Adventures in Assessment,” Volume 16, published by SABES (The System for Adult Basic Education Support)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

 

 

I am really interested in the process of breaking down the initial, and often very broad goals that students articulate in their first engagement with the adult education provider, and using these broad goals to identify sub and mini supporting goals, with both broad and subsequent identified sub and mini goals being used to guide and inform instruction.

This process is intended to fully involve the students with the co-authorship of their learning plans, guiding, informing, and shaping curriculum, and mapping progress toward the larger student broad based goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

 

 

The class is really a series of classes and a way of providing adult education to our students that is responsive and meets their needs. The students drive the developing curriculum and instruction. They regularly evaluate their progress and the direction of continuing learning. The student evaluations help to plot their next steps at the end of each week and the basis of the next body of curriculum.

 

The student reflections at the end of each week really re-set their next group of mini or sub goals and the teacher in collaboration with the students, resources future curriculum designed and intended to help the student achieve the new group of mini or sub goals.

 

I like this process especially because of the student involvement and the organic nature that is built into the planning and instruction. The students are genuinely guiding instruction and very strong partners in their broad based goal achievement. This process honors that plans and learning plans are very organic in nature with the student being a strong partner in the planning process. The EFF planning standards of Planning and Solve Problems and Make Decisions are truly integral to this process as well as many of the other EFF standards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources Needed

 

 

No resources are needed other than a willingness to listen to our students and join with them in the work of planning, guiding, and shaping their learning

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

 

 

I will evaluate this activity by tracking student progress to overall broad based goals as well as the incremental progress measured in student success with mini an sub goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

 

 

Students are a genuine partner in their learning and because of their active involvement in goal setting, mini and sub goal setting, curriculum choice and planning as well as being co-users of formative assessment that is a natural part of this process, the student stays actively informed during their learning experience.

Laura Harrower's picture
First

Activity: Goals Setting Questions:

What are your interests? What do you enjoy doing? What would you like to be able to do that you can't do now?

Why do you want to do it? What skills do you need to do this? Who or what will help you reach your goals? Who or what might get in the way of your reaching your goal?

What will encourage you to hang in there? What three things might happen if you reach your goal? What will you have to do to reach your goal?

How long do you think it will take to reach your goal? How will you know if you have reached your goal? What will you be able to do that you couldn't do before? How will that make you feel? What other goal(s) do you have?

Activity Purpose: Students take ownership of their goals and understand that reaching them is a process that takes planning and time.

Class Description: My students are primarily young adults who are either in the high school completion program or are attending ABE classes.

Resources Needed: Necessary resources are goal setting worksheets, a pen and time!

Evaluation: The goal worksheets can be revisited at intervals of 1 month, 3 months, six months, 1 year, etc. Supports and barriers can be identified/addressed and new goals can be added.

Communicating with Students: Ask: What can you do now that you couldn't do before?

Maryann Starr's picture
First

 

Activity Description

 

 

I plan on using three formative assessment activities that I have never used starting in my Math class this coming Monday 2/29/16. I will have students do one a week for three weeks. !. The first activity is DOODLE (students will be asked to draw rather than use words to show understanding of a Math concept taught that day) I will give them thirty minutes at the end of class. The next week, I will ask students to try the activity called FOUR CORNERS.I will designate each corner of the classroom to represent A,B, C and D . I will have these labeled and taped to the sections of the room. I will ask them questions based on materials covered during the year in Math; students go to the corner that they believe corresponds with the correct answer. The third activity for the following week is called CAPTION PHOTOS.I will choose three photos that represent a process; students will caption each photo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity Purpose

(What result are you looking for?)

 

 

The purpose the activities is to help me as a teacher feed information back to students in ways that enable the student to learn more effectively, and they will help as an ongoing diagnostic tool to modify and adjust my teaching strategies to reflect the needs and progress of students. I also believe that these activities will encourage students to engage more readily in a self-reflective process. The more exposure to different types of formative assessment will lead to more confidence when students self-assess and eventually peer assess.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class Description

(Level and demographics)

 

 

Math Class: There are 8 students in this class. It is a class of low level skills, NRS 1,2 and a few 3. Students range in age from 25-59. Most are in their 40’s.

Two students are not originally from the United States, although they have both lived in Vermont for over twenty years. They as well as the rest of the students had spotty educations. Some left school at an early age due to financial factors, others were home schooled ,but most dropped out of school feeling that there learning style and educational needs were not addressed in the schools they attended.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources Needed

 

 

Paper, index cards, colored pencils and photos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation

(How will you gauge the impact of the activity on your students?)

 

 

Since formative assessment is not something you grade, they will be evaluated by how they respond to each of these activities. I will review their responses individual and together we can create a plan that will address the results of their formative assessments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communicating with Students

(How will your students know whether their performance has improved?)

 

They will know their performance has improved by further formative assessments.

I also will employ summative assessment timed Math drills and pre and post tests  to demonstrate gains or further instruction in a particular area and share those results with my students.