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Science On the Go with the Best Podcasts

Podcasts are a mainstream resource that can be used in the adult education classroom. When subscribing to a specific topic, the listener is introduced to new ideas and becomes exposed to unfamiliar topics. Podcasts enable the listener to develop a broad range of knowledge and promote anytime / anywhere learning. Below are 20 great science podcasts curated by GeekWrapped. I encourage you to listen to at least one of the podcasts on the list and think about how you can use it with your students. Are there others you would include in this list? Share your ideas with the members of our Community of Practice.

  • Star Talk Radio (@StarTalkRadio)by Neil deGrasse Tyson is joined weekly with comedian co-hosts and celebrities to make science engaging and fun. 
  • The Infinite Monkey Cage (@themonkeycage): A humorous conversation with scientists, comedians, and innovators. 
  • 60-Second Science: Quick reports every weekday. 
  • Science Friday (@scifri): Covers everything from octopus camouflage to cooking on Mars. 
  • Talk Nerdy (@CaraSantaMaria) is highly rated with interviews.
  • Science for the People. (@desireeschell & @afterthree) The connection of science, pop culture, history, and public policy is discussed.  
  • The Guardian Science Weeklly (@iansample) Current discussions on the intersection of science and technology. 
  • The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe (@SkepticsGuide) Discussions promote critical thinking where science and pseudoscience intersect. 
  • Radiolap (@radiolab) A combination of podcast and radio show that includes stories and science with music rich documentaries. 
  • Stuff You Should Know (@SYSKPodcast) Do you want to know how landfills work? SYSK covers everything science about the common world around us. 
  • The Story Collider (@story_collider) How does science impact you? Join the Story Collider as they look at the personal connection everyone has with science. 
  • Quirks & Quarks (@CBCQuirks) Who are the scientists? Learn about the people who are behind the latest physical and natural science innovations. 
  • Professor Blastoff (@blastoffpodcast) Fun and interesting science. 
  • Stuff to Blow Your Mind (@BLOWtheMIND) Explore cosmic mysteries. 
  • Probably Science (@ProbablyScience) Weekly science updates with interviews with special guests and comedians. 
  • Nature Podcast (@NaturePodcast) Another high quality show with interviews of the people behind the science. 
  • Physics Central (@PhysicsCentral) breaks physics into easily understandable presentations. 
  • The Naked Scientists(@NakedScientists) break complicated science down into every day language. 
  • BrainStuff(@BrainStuffHSW) Turning trivia and everyday science into fun experiences. 
  • The Science Show explores current research, scandal, and discovery. 

I look forward to your input on podcasts in the classroom. 

Kathy 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: Science, Podcasts

Comments

ecappleton's picture
One hundred

Hi Kathy,

I haven't used podcasts with students yet, but I have been listening to a number of podcasts to improve my background knowledge in science. Here are a couple of the podcasts that have been most useful to me (I've been studying evolution, genetics and heredity):

In Our Time (BBC) Science podcasts - http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01gyd7j - The host Melvyn Bragg is great at getting his academic guests to start at the beginning and give a solid foundation before getting into great detail. The show is an hour long, so there is plenty of time for a lot of depth. The topics range from penicillin to dark matter. I listed to about 10 podcasts related to evolution (how scientists date fossils, history of life on earth, a 4 part series on Darwin's life, etc.). This is my favorite science podcast.

Evolution Talk - http://evolutiontalk.com/ - This bite-sized, entertaining podcast is a great way to learn about the different parts of the theory of evolution and related history of science (including the different personalities Lamarck, Erasmus, Hutton, Lyell, Malthus and so on). There is also a lot related to genetics (Rosalind Franklin, Gregor Mendel, DNA and radioactivity...).

Eric

 

 

 

Kathy_Tracey's picture
One hundred

Thanks for adding these to the list! I think getting students engaged in Science instruction through podcasts can be an easy way to introduce the idea that science is a part of every day life! How do you think you would use it in class? I was listening to This American Life last night and was so excited about the content that I shared the podcast on my social media accounts. This got me thinking about how I could easily assign podcasts to students - not only series, but specific topic. 

Leecy's picture
One hundred

Thanks for the great resources Kathy et al. I'm just getting better and better at using Twitter for my own PD and for sharing ideas with followers. In searching for the podcasts that you posted, I ran into difficulty in accessing them. The author pages open, but where are the podcasts? Would you provide me with some direction? Thanks. Leecy (@leecywise)

Kathy_Tracey's picture
One hundred

Leecy and Friends, 

Click on the link for the podcasts and a more detailed description will appear. Under each description is a link to the podcasts. Although each page is a bit different in their design, you can listen to the latest episode. Hope that helps. 

Kathy 

Leecy's picture
One hundred

Thanks, Kathy. Leecy

Jessie Stadd's picture
One hundred

Looking for recommendations to share with COABE attendees...