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Techniques to Raise GED Scores?

I have a student in their second term of GED prep.  The student is quite "sensitive" to test conditions, (easily distracted by noise and doesn't perform well with timed tests).

He just shared that he's taken the RLA GED Ready 4 times since 09/2019: 146, 142, 137 & 143 (3/2/2020). 

I will call our testing center the the AM, and also the GED org, but was wondering if anybody can share best practices?

Thank you in advance. 

Bernie Floresca

Comments

David J. Rosen's picture
One hundred

Hello Bernie,

Although these may not be easy to obtain, the GED Testing Service does offer test accommodations for those who can document their disabilities.  From their web page: "We are committed to providing students with full access to the GED® test for anyone with disabilities and support the intention of the Americans with Disabilities Act as Amended (ADAAA). Test accommodations are considered on a case-by-case basis and include things such as extra testing time, extra breaks, and a separate testing room."

Perhaps others here have experience with adult learners applying for GED test accommodations that they could share with you here or privately.

David J. Rosen

BERNIE FLORESCA's picture
Ten

Thank you, David, accommodations was part of our strategy session with my student last night.

Here's what I've found out so far.

(800) 466 0450 will help in giving the student extra time, up to 100%   --- for GED Ready.

The same number will help with the application for accommodation, that can take up to 30 days -- via the link you provided, David, thank you! 

The request is initiated within the student's GED account under Profile, and Request accommodations.

Michael Cruse's picture
One hundred

Hi, Bernie -

It's great to hear you were able to start the accommodations request with your student.  Hopefully, they have documentation of their disability to support their request.  In most cases, learners applying for these testing accommodations need documentation from either a psychologist or medical professional.  In cases where the learner demonstrates a need, but doesn't have current documentation, their state's Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) system is a good resource.  State VR will often times be able to help adults with disabilities receive the appropriate evaluations that will support testing accommodations.  To be fair, this can take some time, especially if the individual is not currently a client of their state's VR system.  Learners and program staff can learn more about their state's VR system here.

Best,

Mike Cruse

Disabilities and Equitable Outcomes Moderator

michaelcruse74@gmail.com 

 

BERNIE FLORESCA's picture
Ten

Thank you, Mike.  Documentation is a no go, student doesn't have insurance.  We're looking into Vocational Rehab agency, but seems like a long shot. I'm informing the student of the options and I'm lettiig him "drive" what we do.  

_Bernie Floresca.

ashly winkle's picture
Fifty

I recently made this test-taking strategies HyperDoc lesson. My teachers and I have found it very effective with those students with extremely high anxiety. Feel free to make a copy if you want to use it.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1aQgbJdDlMmL301brEJy5_7aSPqyOQVqhWWozeLZYuw8/edit?usp=sharing

taymans's picture
Ten

What a wonderful resource you have developed! Do you students provide feedback on which tips work best for them?

ashly winkle's picture
Fifty

No, but I love that idea!!!! 

BERNIE FLORESCA's picture
Ten

Wow, thank you for sharing, Ashly!

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