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Video Contest on NSF Projects!

Dear Science COP Colleagues:

Thanks to Cynthia Zafft for calling this to our attention! This week, the National Science Foundation is hosting its 2015 NSF Teaching and Learning Showcase: Improving Science, Math, Engineering, and Computer Science Education (May 11-15, 2015). Seven NSF resource centers are showcasing NSF work through short, (<3 minute) videos. Presenters and the public-at-large can vote on these videos for the “Public Choice” award, indicating the video that is most effective in conveying the creative work being done. Winning videos will be announced on May 18.

This is an interesting way to see the NSF-funded work conducted in STEM education. I invite you to check it out!

As you view these videos, I hope you’ll share any ideas that they spark for you about teaching science in adult education.

Cheers!

Jackie

Jackie Taylor

Science COP Moderator


About the 2015 NSF Teaching and Learning Showcase: Improving Science, Math, Engineering, and Computer Science Education:

Seven NSF funded resource centers including, MSPnet, CADRE, CIRCL, CAISE, STELAR, CS10K and ARC have come together to host this cross-center online video event to showcase cutting-edge NSF work.

During the five days of this online showcase event, members of all of the resource centers are encouraged to participate and will be able to view the video presentations, participate in facilitated discussions of each video, and vote for the videos that are most effective in conveying the creative work being done. We hope that you will invite colleagues to visit the event website to also participate and engage with the presentations. All videos and discussions will be archived for future access there after.

Goals: The event will showcase cutting-edge NSF-funded work to improve teaching and learning and will allow colleagues affiliated with MSPnet, CADRE, CIRCL, CAISE, STELAR, CS10K community, and ARC to view, discuss, and comment on each others’ work. It will also allow each project to disseminate their work to the public at large, helping NSF achieve its goal of broad dissemination of innovative work.

Presenters: Projects from these resource center communities were invited to present their work by creating a short (<3 minute) video that showcases their intervention, innovation, and/or research. Videos will address potential impact, promise, and challenges.

Facilitators: Each of the resource centers provided event facilitators to be actively involved in the presentation discussions during the five days of the online event. In addition, they will vote for those presentations they feel use extraordinary creativity in the use of video to share innovative work to determine ’Facilitators” Choice.” We are grateful for their time and work in this event.

Recognitions: During the event, facilitators from each resource center will select a few videos, which will recognize extraordinary creativity in the use of video to share innovative work to determine the “Facilitators’ Choice.” In addition, all presenters will have the opportunity to vote for their favorite videos to determine “Presenters’ Choice.” Finally, all public visitors to the event will be asked to select those videos that they find most compelling. Those with the greatest number of public votes will receive “Public Choice” recognition. All presentations that are selected by facilitators, presenters, and by the public will be announced on May 18, 2015 and will be published on this showcase website. They will be broadly recognized throughout the NSF and STEM Ed communities as well.

Guests, including funders, PIs, teachers, administrators, professional developers, industry and the public at large are invited to watch the videos, post comments to the presenters’ discussions, and vote for the “Public Choice.”

The Videohall.com platform was created by the Center for School Reform at TERC with support from the National Science Foundation. Opinions expressed on this site are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of the Foundation.

 

 

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