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Writing phonetically helps learning to read - time for truespel

A Harvard study this year found that kindergarten students who tried to write using their own phonetic system were the best readers.  This shows that they crave a phonetic system which is modeled after traditional spelling as much as possible.  Truespel phonetics provides this system with one spelling for each of US English 40 phonemes adopting best choice phonics for the phonemes.  Truespel tutorials and a converter are free on the internet.  Learn about phoneme frequency in text also.  See http://justpaste.it/truequest . Phonetics isn't difficult anymore

Comments

Leecy's picture

Thomas, thanks for posting this appealing alternative to traditional literacy instruction.

From what I read on the links you posted, apparently, kids are taught the new symbols so that they can interpret words more easily and with more control. I wonder why this system produces better readers than the practice of "teaching" phonemic awareness and then phonics, using any preferred phonics-learning approach, concurrently with having students practice sight words. It sounds like with Treuspel, students would have to take additional steps to be able to read phonetically-spelled words. Is there anything published on using Truespel with adults? What differences might we find if so? Has anyone here used Truespel with adult learners? What do you think?

Note: The following two links are broken on the page you posted:

  1.  The final answer is truespel phonetics  http://jsutepaste.it/truescience
  2.  See typing as I talk at https://www.screenr.com/3KeN 

Thanks, again, Thomas. Leecy

Thomas Zurinskas's picture

Dear Thomas,

One of the links that didn't work was mistyped,  it should be https://justpaste.it/truescience 

The other lilnk in "acreenr" has been shut down because screenr has shut down I suppose.

Regarding adults using truespel, there is an informal study of high school ESL students in Korea that said they could learn truespel in under an hour and preferred it to IPA.  Note that a speech therapist in California is using it as well.  

Phonics has the disadvantage of having many spelling forms for a sound.  For instance the ~k sound is most often letter c, then k,then ch (as in school) then x. There are hundreds of spelling forms for all 40 sounds of US English.  But phonetically there are only 40 spellings for 40 sounds.  True phonemic awareness, which is so important.

A tutorial link on truespel is at https://justpaste.it/course2       Tom

Paul Rogers's picture

Leecy, Tom and group members -  True Spell is a good  program that could work with English speaking children who are learning to read for the first time. But for adult ESL students, True Spell is unworkable, in my opinion.

The problem is that an adult English learner cannot pronounce certain letters and combinations of letters, whereas English speaking children have no problems in pronunciation.

So - it is necessary to teach pronunciation using phonics at the beginning of an adult’s ESL lessons, along with word recognition or vocabulary building.

Some teachers use the International Phonetic Alphabet, which, in my view, is too complicated and takes too long to learn.

But there is an alternative used by most English language learners all over the world. All that is necessary to do is to provide the  phonetic spelling of words written in such a way as to show how that learner would write the sounds of the words along with a translation.  

For example, for Spanish speakers:  Table - teibl - mesa

Then there should be lessons on the English pronunciation rules, demonstrated with lots of humor by the teacher.

It takes a long time to learn English pronunciation, but by weaving phonetics into each lesson, students will gradually achieve success.

My Pumarosa program is phonetic and bilingual and has proven to be an effective method to help adult Spanish speakers learn English pronunciation and reading. It is free and very easy to navigate. In addition I have produced some YouTube videos which you can find on inglesconprofepablo.com, Pronunciation.

Below are the locations for most of the lessons on Pumarosa. It can work well with students whose first language is not Spanish also.

 

PUMAROSA URLS

NIVEL 1 PRINCIPIANTE

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/index/beginner/load.htm?f

Lesson 1 - The Alphabet

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/alphabet/index/load.htm?f

Spell out loud

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/alphabet/spellout/load.htm?f

Lesson 2 - The Numbers

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/numbers/index/load.htm?f

Numbers - Pronunciation

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/numbers/pron_num/load.htm?f

Practice - What time is it?

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/numbers/time/load.htm?f

Practice - Comercio/How much does it cost?

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/numbers/commerce/load.htm?

Practice - How much is ….Exercise/ejercicio

How Much | Cuánto

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/numbers/howmuch/load.htm?f

LESSON 3 - GREETINGS / SALUDOS

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/greetings/index/load.htm?f

DIALOGUE

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/greetings/dialog/load.htm?f

TRANSLATION EXERCISE

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/greetings/trans_greet/load.htm?f

LESSON 4 - COGNATES / COGNADOS

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/cognates/index/load.htm?f

TRANSLATION EXERCISE

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/cognates/trans_cog/load.htm?f

PRONUNCIATION

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/cognates/pron_cog/load.htm?f

VERBS

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/cognates/verbs/load.htm?f

LESSON 5 - SUSTANTIVOS / NOUNS

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/nouns_adj/index/load.htm?f

ADJECTIVES / ADJETIVOS

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/nouns_adj/adjective/load.htm?f

COLORS, SHAPES, SIZES – COLORES, FORMAS TAMANOS

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/nouns_adj/colors_shapes/load.htm?f

TRANSLATION EXERCISE

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/nouns_adj/trans_na/load.htm?f

COMPARATIVE

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/nouns_adj/comparative/load.htm?f

TRANSLATION EXERCISE

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/nouns_adj/ex_comparative/load.htm?f

LESSON 6 - ARTICLES

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/articles/index/load.htm?f

EXERCISE

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/articles/ex_art/load.htm?f

LESSON 7 – PRONOUNS / PRONOMBRES

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/pronouns/index/load.htm?f

EXERCISE

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/pronouns/ex_prono/load.htm?f

LESSON 8 – TO BE/SER Y ESTAR

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/tobe/index/load.htm?f

TRANSLATION EXERCISE

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/tobe/trans_tobe/load.htm?f

LESSON 9- FOOD

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/food/index/load.htm?f

AT THE RESTAURANT

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/food/food_restaurant/load.htm?f

DIALOGO – CASA AZUL

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/food/food_dialog/load.htm?f

AT THE MARKET

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/food/food_market/load.htm?f

DIALOGO

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/food/food_dialogmarket/load.htm?f

LESSON 10 – QUESTION WORDS / PALABRAS QUE FORMAN PREGUNTAS

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/wquestions/index/load.htm?f

LESSON 11 – DIRECTIONS

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/directions/index/load.htm?f

DIALOGO –

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/directions/directions_dialog/load.htm?f

LESSON 12 -

THE HOUSE / LA CASA

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/house/index/load.htm?f

CLOTHES

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/house/house_clothes/load.htm?f

THE FAMILY

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/house/family/load.htm?f

THE SCHOOL

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/house/school/load.htm?f

PARTS OF THE BODY

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/house/body_parts/load.htm?f

LESSON 13 – CONFUSING WORDS / PALABRAS QUE CONFUNDEN

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/confusing_words/index/load.htm?f

PAST TENSE

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/confusing_words/past_tense/load.htm?f

LESSON 14 – HOW DO YOU SAY…? COMO SE DICE…?

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/how_say/index/load.htm?f

LESSON 15 -  PRONUNCIATION OF VOWELS, CONSONANTS AND COMBINATIONS

VOWELS -http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/pronunciation/index/load.htm?f

COMBINATION OF VOWELS

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/pronunciation/vowels_comb/load.htm?f

CONSONANTS

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/pronunciation/consonants/play.htm?f

COMBINATION OF CONSONANTS

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/pronunciation/consonants_comb/load.htm?f

VOWELS AND CONSONANTS

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/pronunciation/vow_cons_comb/load.htm?f

TONGUES TWISTERS – TRABALENGUAS

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/pronunciation/tongue_twisters/load.htm?f

PRACTICE LEVEL 1

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/index/beginner_excercises/load.htm?f

 

Nivel 2 - Level 2 / Intermedio - Intermediate

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/index/intermediate/load.htm?f

Nivel 3 / Level 3

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/index/civics/load.htm?f

Nivel 4 / Level 4

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/index/ushistory/load.htm?f

Nivel 5 / Level 5

http://www.pumarosa.com/ingles/index/100questions/load.htm?f

 

Leecy's picture

Thanks for posting your list the useful resources that you have developed for Spanish speakers in the US. I hope others drop in to comment on the usefulness of these or other tools that they successfully use among adults hoping to spell better! Leecy

Paul Rogers's picture

Yes, Leecy, Pumarosa is very useful to teach English spellling along with grammar and pronunciation, etc. Years ago I wrote a text about learning to spell which might be of use to some teachers. Here is an excerpt, if anyone would like the whole text just email me at pumarosa21@yahoo.com.

By the way, if anyone should ask for my bonafides in writing this, in 1958 I won the 8th grade spelling bee in Ms. Preble's English class at Lincoln Jr. High School in Melrose, Mass!!!!

LEARNING TO SPELL IN ENGLISH
by Paul Rogers, 2005
     Good writing in English should begin with good spelling. Although advances in technology have given us "Spell Check", it is my opinion that learning to spell well is an important “ingredient”  to a "command" of the English language. 
      However, learning to spell correctly is difficult even for native English speakers. English words are too often not spelled the way in which they are pronounced, primarily due to the fact that English is a mixture of other languages, such as German, French, Spanish, and … who knows?
     One key factor is that learning to spell depends upon good pronunciation:  
     "The most effective way to improve spelling is to improve pronunciation?"
(Reference Manual For The Office, by Clifford R. House and Kathie Sigler, 1989, Southwest Publishing Company,
Cincinnati, Ohio) 
     For EFL/ESL students, difficulties in pronunciation are compounded by the fact that it is frustrating to learn how to reproduce certain English sounds which do not exist in their native languages. And this problem, in turn, leads to an inability to hear and understand many words when spoken out loud. 
     To “solve” all of the above complications, I have developed a phonetic system to learn English as a Foreign language, and include a variety of lessons and exercises to help students “master” English as easily as possible. My material is bilingual, Spanish/English, but can be used by other students as well.
(from SPELLING, at the bottom of https://www.inglesconprofepablo.com/la-gramatica-ingles---indice)

A. "The Long and Short of It"
     Review of the vowels - a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes y. 
    English vowels are divided into two sounds:
long and short. 
     1. Long = A vowel is said to be long when the
sound made is longer than the sound made for ...short
vowels! Plus the sound is made along the bridge of the
nose. Long a, e, i, and o are pronounced exactly like
their names; long u is pronounced like the u in tube,
and long y is pronounced like the word eye.
     2. Short = A vowel is said to be short when it is
pronounced using less air than long vowels, with the
sound located low in the throat (in the "Adam's
apple"). The short a has three sounds, whereas the
other vowels only have one specific short sound.

     Note: When the vowel E is at the end of a word or
follows an E, the sound is changed from short to long.

           PRACTICE 
LONG A  = "ei" 
all "ay" words:
bay (bei) - bahia
day (dei) - día
play (plei) - jugar o tocar
say (sei) - decir
way (wei) - metodo, via

cape - bare - fare - plane

SHORT A = 3 SOUNDS - 
     1. Like the letter a in the word "cachucha" -
bar - barra
car - carro
far - lejos

     2. "ae" -
cap (caep) - cachucha
bad (baed) - malo
cat (caet) - gato
man (maen) - hombre
     
3. Like the "o" in "octubre"
     all (awl)
     ball (bawl)
     call (cawl)
     fall (fawl)
     hall (jawl)
     tall (tawl)
     wall (iuawl)

LONG E =  "i"

etc....

Leecy's picture

Thanks for sharing the Spanish-equivalent pronunciation excerpt, Paul. Above all, congratulations on winning your 8th grade spelling bee! Hat's off! Leecy 

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