Skip to main content

What disability do you see most often in your classes or programs?

Dear Disability in Adult Education CoP,

In an effort to understand the population of students with disabilities that you work with, or would like to learn how to work with better, I am asking you to respond to this simple poll.  Please select the one disability category that best represents the students you have in your classes, or programs.  If you do not have students with disabilities, or are unaware of their documentation, please respond by selecting the category which you are most interested in learning how to serve in your program.

Thanks,                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Mike

michaelcruse74@gmail.com

For more information on these categories, you can go online to: http://web.jhu.edu/disabilities/faculty/types_of_disabilities/

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders

Blindness or Low Vision

Brain Injuries

Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing

Learning Disabilities

Medical Disabilities

Physical Disabilities

Psychiatric Disabilities

Speech and Language Disabilities

Physical Disabilities
0% (0 votes)
Psychiatric Disabilities
14% (1 vote)
Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing
0% (0 votes)
Medical Disabilities
0% (0 votes)
Learning Disabilities
71% (5 votes)
Brain Injuries
0% (0 votes)
Speech and Language Disabilities
0% (0 votes)
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders
14% (1 vote)
Blindness or Low Vision
0% (0 votes)
Total votes: 7

Comments

Crippenb's picture
I am and Adult Basic Education Instructor. Learning Disabilities, Brain Injuries, and Mental Health issues are a sort of three-way tie in my classes.  While some students may have been in Special Ed. classes, there are no current assessments or documentation-just anecdotal observations or sometimes students will reveal a past accident or illness.  I would like to know more about getting students properly assessed and how to find them the services they need (when they are available).  Additionally, managing medication is a struggle for many students with mental illness; this, of course, is the individual's responsibility but it certainly affects their ability to learn and to have positive interactions in class. Beth Ann Crippen
Michael Cruse's picture

Hi, Beth Ann -

Thank you for taking the time to share more about your student population, and some of the challenges you're facing in helping connect students to assessment, documentation and services.  This is a challenge for many adults, that I hope we can address as a community.

One place to begin is with your state's Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) system.  A list of each state's VR system contacts is available here.  Unlike in K-12 special education, adults must apply for services with their state's VR system, and must have an interest in working in the future.  Once an individual is found eligible for services, they work with a VR counselor to develop an individual plan for employment - which often includes education and/or training in support of a person's employment goal.  Many VR systems also provide psychological testing to assist in identifying a person's need for specific supports and services through their system.

Another option worth investigating is nearby teaching hospitals and universities with graduate programs in psychology.  These programs may be able to provide low or no cost testing to identify a disability, through their graduate interns.  You want to make sure that any interns are supervised by licensed professionals, who are able to validate the testing for ethical and legal reasons.

What are some other thoughts that group members have around helping students with suspected disabilities find sources for formal identification?

Best,

Mike

michaelcruse74@gmail.com