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Blended Learning in Adult Education by Rosen

Please pass this around to anyone in the field who would benefit from having one spot where they can find out what all the buzz is about blended learning, learn what it is and isn't or would like to deepen their understanding of it.   See the most recent Tech Tip and/or attend a free webinar given by our very own LINCS Technology and Learning Discussion facilitator, David Rosen. It is on November 13th at 2:00 Eastern Time. If you can not make it, register and the recording will be emailed to you for later viewing. So register now!

Thanks,

Steve Quann

 

Comments

David J. Rosen's picture
One hundred

Colleagues,

Thanks to Steve Quann for alerting everyone on October 22nd to tomorrow's -- Friday November 13th -- Blended Learning webinar. I am surprised and delighted to learn that nearly 500 people have signed up for it. It is still possible to register until 1:30 P.M. on Friday. It's only an hour, so it will be an intro to how to think about blended learning in which I touch on many questions, pieces of useful information, and online resources for blended learning. For many, it will just whet their appetite; for others, it may fill in some gaps or get them thinking about things differently. I hope there will be many more questions than I could possibly answer in that time frame, although I will try to answer a few.

I would like to extend the invitation to everyone who is interested to follow up by joining me for a discussion here beginning next week, and onward, about blended learning. Although I have written an adult educator's  guide on blended learning, we have many people here who are very knowledgeable about blended learning, not the least of whom are the teachers who do blended learning with their students, and those who teach or participate in blended learning professional development. I don't see this as an expert-to-participant discussion, but a discussion among colleagues who are interested in blended learning, some of whom also use blended learning approaches or models.  If there are questions from the webinar that I don't get to, perhaps we could start with those.

David J. Rosen

Moderator, Technology and Learning CoP

djrosen123@gmail.com

 

David J. Rosen's picture
One hundred

Technology and Learning Colleagues,

Here are some links to resources for our discussion beginning next week on Blended Learning:

On Monday, November 16th, I will post some of the questions for our discussion from those who participated in the webinar -- questions that might be answered by any of a number of people here who use blended learning, several of whom were on the webinar, and others. I will also weigh in where I can with answers to some of the questions, and with some questions of my own. My hope is that we have a robust discussion of blended learning from a wide range of viewpoints and that many of the members of this CoP will join in.

David J. Rosen

Moderator, Technology and Learning CoP

djrosen123@gmail.com

 

 

Paul Rogers's picture
One hundred

David, I know you will probably discuss this question tomorrow, but I am interested to know if there is an increase in using technology in general, and a trend in Blended/Distance learning.

Paul

Paul Rogers's picture
One hundred

David  and others, I was not able to participate in the discussion of blended learning but was able to read some of the documents. And I have had some experience in blended ESL programs, so I would like to add a few comments.

First. I believe that the use of technology is an important benefit to community based programs that serve the immigrant population. Classes such as ESL and Citizenship can be offered to more and more people using blended classes and Distance learning. Working people can more readily attend these classes. And they, of course, are usually offered in social service centers, libraries, churches, etc. and are more accessible to people than college based classes.

I would like to see more discussions about the differences between community based and college based adult education so that we can focus more on the needs of the former. 

Paul Rogers

 

 

Leecy's picture
One hundred

Paul, I, too, had to miss David's great session as I was on the road and out of reach. I appreciate your follow-up on that session re blended learning among community based programs. Here in the Four Corners, we do a lot of distance learning through a non-profit organization that has state-of-the-art live-video equipment capable of offering instructions anywhere in the world where connectivity exists.

I know that David will respond more fully, but I definitely think that technology is increasingly providing ways of reaching populations that are interested in learning outside of the requirements imposed in formal programs. We do increasingly reach folks through technology here in this vast, rural, multicultural population in four states, which include both Ute Mt. Ute and Navajo Reservations. The possibilities are endless. Many of the characteristics that define ESL and immigrant populations also apply to Native Americans who struggle to stay in our public schools and who often struggle with the English language. We work with students who are native speakers of English and are bilingual. However, they often have an English -peaking vocabulary of around 600 words and very little exposure to the rules imposed in our "dominant" and formal educational environments.

Please share more about how you are using blended learning to reach students. What technologies and approaches have you found successful? Leecy
 

Paul Rogers's picture
One hundred

Leecy,  I understand your point about adult education as a whole, and I see the “informal” as a conduit to the “formal” classes, so that someone can learn enough English in a small class at a library, for example, to continue on to a GED, then to a BA and further. As you said: the possibilities are endless!

The issue is funding, and apparently government funding comes with a lot of strings attached, which is understandable, but in some cases works against the interest of the students.

But non-profit educational foundations are more flexible in their requirements. Of course most community programs already are funded by grants, but for operations and outreach programs. We need to find those foundations that fund adult education, especially Distance Learning.

There are other fund-raising ideas that can be explored, such as – asking all the businesses in town for support! Bake sales!

As far as other items are concerned, yes, the list I sent needs to be developed. We need a lot of nuts and bolts.

The  programs at the Four Corners sound wonderful. I am particularly impressed that they can be viewed anywhere, which is the essence of Distance Learning…anybody, anytime, anyplace, anyhow! 

Paul

Leecy's picture
One hundred

Paul, Yes,! "We need to find those foundations that fund adult education, especially Distance Learning." If a network develops, that single section would provide a huge benefit to informal on nonfomal programs.

I search for and write  foundation grants on a weekly basis using Grant Station.com, which is not free, unfortunately. They have sales every year that go as low as $139/yr for non-profits. Their resources are vast, but they are only now starting to develop search engines for adult learning. I wrote and also spoke to their staff about including adult ed in their categories. They now do!!! It pays to holler sometimes. :) Still, there are not a lot of funders willing to dish out $ to poor programs like the ones here in the 4 Corners, especially of operating expenses. Of course, all government funding restricts budgets to 5% administration costs. Managers and directors have to beg and borrow to fund their administrative expenses, which are high: bookkeepers, clerks, supervision, technical maintenance, on and on. Still, they stay open, with PT teachers who come and go year around. How they do it, I don't know. Leecy

Paul Rogers's picture
One hundred

Leecy, years ago I did some research on grants for what used to be called Bridging the Digital Divide, and I still have the list of a lot of foundations, plus grants etc. for refurbished computers. 
I also think that approaching local businesses for grants is a good way to go, especially the large companies.

I recently found this list of grants that most schools and non-profits can apply for to obtain funding for integrating technology.
 
GRANTS INDEX SAMPLING
TAKE A LOOK AT RECENT GRANTS
Take a look at recent grants in this Alphabetical Listing. Then, in Grants Index-by-Type, see a Grants Index for your Sector. Receive a Grants Index of your choice Free with your subscription to Technology Grant News or 'Technology Grant & Resource News' Electronic.

Legend:
(NP)  For Non Profit Organizations  (SP)  For Social Service Providers 
(TC)  For Towns & Cities (SU)  For Schools & Universities 
(CSP)  For Cross-cutting Sectors & Partnerships

Search by: Alphabetical Listing or Grants Index-by-Type
 
NP, SU,CSP
    
American Association of University Women
Funding Opportunity for Equity Programs
in Math & Technology Science
(319) 337-1716
http://www.aauw.org
    
NP, SP,
SU
    
H1-B Technology Skills Training Grants for Workforce Development
U.S. Department of Labor
Federal Grant
Government Grants for Higher Education, Grants for Non Profit Organizations
Technology Funding for Training for and by Non Profit Organizations,
Higher Education
Contact: Ella Freeman, Tel: (202) 693-3301; #17.261; #17.263
http://www.dol.gov
 
NP, SP
    
A Territory Resource Foundation Grants
Foundation Grants
Funding Source
Grants for Non Profit Organizations for Technical Assistance
& Technology for Social Change
Non Profit Organizations in Northwest U.S.
States of Washington, Oregon, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho
http://www.atrfoundation.org
 
    
NP, S
    
The Handspring Corporation
Corporate Grant
Free Cash Grants & Product Donations
Handheld Computers
Funding Source for Non Profit Organizations
for Youth & Schools & After-School Programs
Email: foundation@handspring.com
http://www.handspring.com/company/foundation
NP, SP,TC, SU
    
Chevron Foundation
Foundation Grants
Funding School Technology
To Promote Excellence in Science, Math & Technology
Education & Equal Access
Tel: (415) 894-7700
Email: Chevweb@chevron.com
http://www.chevron.com/community /index.html
 
    
NP
    
Harbinger Partners
Technology Pioneers Program
Funding Opportunity for Non Profit Organizations
Technology Grants for Boston-Area Non Profit Organizations
http://www.harbingerpartners.org/go/np/apply
NP, S
    
Cisco Corporation
Corporate Grant Funding Opportunity
K-12 Grants: Growing with Technology Grants
http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/779
/smbiz/agwt/awards_categories.html
Non Profit Grants: Cisco Product Grants: Ongoing
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/about/ac48/
about_cisco_grant_program09186a00800afdb3.html
 
    
NP, SP,
TC, SU
    
Hewlett-Packard Foundation
Foundation Grant
Funding School Technology
Non Profit Grants for Technology for Program Delivery
Contact Catherine Gowen, Tel: (650) 857-8955
http://www.packfound.org/htm/ccti_rfp.htm
NP, L
    
Cyberchase Initiative for Libraries
American Library Association
Funding Opportunity for Libraries
Library Cyberchase Math Workshop Grants
http://www.ala.org/publicprograms/
    
NP, SP,
SU, CSP
    
i2Foundation
Corporate Grant
Technology Funding to Improve Quality of Life
& Health
Contact Bindu Nambiar, Tel: (469) 357-7777
http://www.i2foundation.org
 
TC
    
3Com Urban Challenge Grants
Corporate Grants
Funding Opportunity for Cities
Urban Challenge Technology Grants
to Towns & Cities Committed to Using
Technology to improve residents' lives
http://www.3com.com/urbanchallenge
    
NP,SU
    
Institute of Museum & Library Services
Preservation & Digitization Support
for Libraries & Museums
Federal Grant
Funding Source For Museum Grants
For Technology Funding for Library-Museum Collaborations
Email: imlsinfo@imls.gov
http://www.imls.gov/grants/dedln.index.htm
http://www.imls.gov
 
S
    
3Com – Evista
Educational Grants
TeacherPrep Grants for Schools & School Districts
http://www.evistaconsulting.com
    
NP, SP,
TC, SU
    
Intel Foundation
Foundation Grants
Funding School Technology
Intel Foundation Grants for School Technology
http://www.intel.com/intel/community
NP< SP JPMorgan Chase
Bridging the Digital Divide
Corporate Grants
Funding Source for Community Development Grants
to Faith-Based Non Profit Organizations
http://www.intel.com http://www.jpmorganchase.com/cm
/cs?pagename=Chase/Href&urlname=
jpmc/community/grants/programs/cdhs/faith
http://www.jpmorganchase.com
 
NP,SP,
TC,SU
    
Coleman Foundation
Foundation Grants
Entrepreneurship Awareness and Education Grants
With Initiative to Incorporate Technology Into Curriculum
Tel: (608) 262-9982 or (312) 902-7124
Email: jgillman@facstaff.wisc.edu
Email: coleman@colemanfoundation.org
http://www.colemanfoundation.org
    
SU, CSP
    
Lucent Foundation
Foundation Grants
Funding Source
For Public School & University Partnerships
Educator-Academic Partnerships for Youth
With Technology Focus
Philanthropic Initiative Inc.
Tel: (617) 338-2590
http://www.lucent.com
 
NP, SP,
TC, SU
    
CyberLearning - National Education Foundation
Foundation Grant Funding Opportunity
Technology Training & Coursework Matching Grant Program
Grants to over 300 online Personal Computing & IT courses in multiple
Languages for Non Profit Organizations, Higher Education, K-12
Tel: (703) 823-9999
http://www.cyberlearning.org/grants.asp
 
    
NP
    
The National Business Plan Competition
for Non Profit Organizations
Yale University & Goldman Sachs Foundation
Free Cash Grant
Funding Opportunity
Grant For Non Profit Organizations
http://ventures.yale.edu/aboutcompetition.asp
NP, TC,
SU
    
Digital Government Grants
Federal Grant
Government Grants for Non Profit Organizations
Government Grants for Academic-Government or Non Profit
Partnerships to Further Electronic Applications in Government
http://www.nsf.gov/pubsys/ods/getpub.cfm?nsf02156
    
NP, TC,
SU, CSP
    
National Endowment for the Humanities
Federal Grant
Government Grants
For Digital Preservation & Emerging Technologies for Humanities
Humanities Access, Education & Training
Tel: (202) 606-8570 or (202) 606-8446
Email: info@neh.gov
http://www.neh.gov
http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/pet.html
 
S
    
First Energy of Ohio
Corporate Grants
Educational Technology Grants
In Math, Science, and Technology
Tel: (330) 384-5022
http://www.firstenergycorp.com/community/
    
NP, SP,
TC, SU
    
National Institutes of Health
Federal Grant
Government Grants
Science Education Grants
For Partnerships, Technology Centers, Grants for Non Profit Organizations,
Science Museum Grants, Colleges & Universities
to work with scientists to promote science
and health careers
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide
 
TC
    
First Responder
High Tech Emergency Response Equipment
for U.S. Fire Departments
Corporate Grant
Funding Opportunity
For Technology Funding
http://www.FirstResponder.org/
 
    
NP
    
NEC
Corporate Grant
Non Profit Grants For Technology
for Non Profit Organizations That Assist the Disabled
http://www.necfoundation
http://www.necus.com
NP, CSP
    
Globix Corporation
Non Profit Grant
Technology Funding
To Use the Internet as a Business Tool
Funding for Non Profit Organizations, Ronnie Schultz
Email: rschultz@globix.com
http://www.globix.com
 
    
NP
    
Net Impact
Non Profit Grant
"Service Corps" Offering Free Pro Bono MBA Services
to Non Profit Organizations
http://www.net-impact.org
NP, SP,
CU, S
    
National Science Foundation
Federal Grant
Government Grant Funding Source
For Educational Technology Grants
Science Education Grants
http://www.nsf.gov
    
NP, S
    
Oracle Help Us Help Foundation
Foundation Grant
Educational Technology Grants
For ThinkQuest Program
Fostering Classroom Participation in Website Content & Development
Program
Email: thinkquest_ww@oracle.com
http://www.thinkquest.org/tqusa/
 
NP
    
Progressive Technology Project
Technology Funding
Non Profit Grants To Support Use of Technology by Grassroots
Non Profit Organizations
http://www.progressivetech.org/Program
/grantmaking.htm
    
NP, SP
    
Prudential Financial Foundation
Foundation Grant
Funding School Technology
Grants for Non Profit Organizations
Ready to Learn, Ready to Work, Ready to Live Program Grants
http://www.prudential.com/productsAndServices
/0,1474,intPageID%253D1444
%2526blnPrinterFriendly%253D0,00.html
http://www.prudential.com
 
NP,S
    
RadioShack
Corporate Grant
Fund Raiser Idea
Funding Opportunity for Technology
Grants for Equipment for Child and Family Safety Efforts
http://www.radioshackcorporation.com/cr
/contrib_program.shtml
    
NP, S
    
RGK Foundation
Foundation Grant
Educational Technology Grants
Grants For Non Profit Organizations
& K-12 Science, Math & Technology Programs
With Emphasis on Science, Technology Math for Female & Minority Students
http://www.rgkfoundation.org/guidelines.php
 
NP
    
Technovation Award
Corporate Grant
Non Profit Funding
Email: symposium@blackbaud.com
http://www.blackbaud.com
    
NP, SP
    
Verizon Foundation
Foundation Grant
Non Profit Funding
Educational Technology Grants
Scholarships, Technology Training & Free Cell Phones

1) Free Technology Training from Verizon
In Cooperation with Technology Works for Good & Confluence Corporation
Email: training@technologyworks.org
http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=6vdjbwn6.izlyfun6.qbzcvtn6&p
=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.
technologyworks.org%2Feducation%2Fverizon
_etraining.php

2) Verizon Educational Grants for Texas School & Non Profit Organizations
http://www.verizon.com/foundation

3) Verizon HopeLine Cell Phone Grants
Non Profit Grants for New York and New Jersey Non Profit Organizations
Tel: (845) 429-3839
http://www.verizonwireless.com/hopeline
http://news.verizonwireless.com/news/2003/06
/pr2003-06-25a.html

4) Verizon Technology Grants Funding for Workforce Development Projects in Virginia
http://www.verizon.com/foundation

Paul

Leecy's picture
One hundred

Paul, thanks so much for the list. I will explore them and share them.

What do the rest of you think of these resources? Anything to add? Leecy

Edward Latham's picture
One hundred

I would like to acknowledge that funding is almost always a benefit to have on hand, but it often overshadows another issue that may be more important. Especially with adult learners, we need to continue to explore ways to shift our educational practices. Anyone that has attempted to teach in traditional manners through distance learning or through a blended learning has probably noticed that evidence of student success in "what was covered" is often very sparse. Good educational opportunities in a blended environment take much time, planning, and a skill set that is not inherent in many of us. Some may develop great asynchronous activities, some may have awesome face to face engagements, but it is rare to find both types of interaction done well WITH SEAMLESS FLOW and connection. This is very hard for most of us to do well and many of the resource providers avoid the whole concept of seamless flow all together. Instead they concentrate on how great their disjointed activities are or how the technology looks and feels cool. 

There are some that argue that good education could be achieved with sticks, mud, and maybe a few rocks. I may agree that the way we offer educational learning opportunities is the most critical factor, but I can certainly subscribe to the fact that technology can help increase access to education for many. I guess I just worry that all the attention is centered on the increased access, or the marketing "expansion of services" end of things instead of how important the need to shift pedagogy is in this process. Even more alarming is the lack of resources to help many of our educators make this shift. After all, almost all of us never grew up with these types of opportunities and many of us were not formally trained in these environments. 

The webinar David offered was awesome at introducing us to what Blended Learning is and is not and the resources shared further help "sell" the concept and ideas. Technology has offered major power for us to use, but if we use it in standard educational ways, we are back to the effectiveness of sticks, mud and rocks. 

Paul Rogers's picture
One hundred

Edward, I agree with your point of view, and would suggest that we need to define exactly what the problems are and how to shift them or fix them.

In a report I posted earlier, it concludes with "three overarching recommendations: first, hold programs accountable for outcomes through data; second, design programs around learner needs and goals; and third, establish funding models built around success, including adult public charter schools." The report also criticizes a "one size fits all approach" of adult ed, and recommends more flexibility instead of rigid restrictions.

So ...what are the problem areas that need to be examined and, then, hopefully fixed or shifted? I think you are right: when this question is approached then the question of funding can be better examined.

Report = Repairing the Nation's Education System for Adult English Learners,
Lexington Institute, July, 2013, 15 pp.
Authors: Sean Kennedy & John Walters

 

Leecy's picture
One hundred

Edward, I smiled when I read, "There are some that argue that good education could be achieved with sticks, mud, and maybe a few rocks." I have long claimed that I could teach literacy or ESL from a shoe label! :) You also said, "Especially with adult learners, we need to continue to explore ways to shift our educational practices." Hear, hear! Leecy

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