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IET? Preparing Learners for Clean Energy Jobs

Hello colleagues, Many of us are thinking about and planning to start Integrated Education and Training classes. As we embark on this type of collaboration, we are faced with the need to develop curriculum. One of the most in-demand career paths these days is in the field of clean energy. If your community is one that is seeking to prepare more people for careers in clean energy, you are in luck because adult educators in Massachusetts have prepared a wonderful resource focused specifically on this industry cluster.

Check out this LINCS resource: "The Clean Energy Ambassadors Curriculum Resource Guide is a collection of materials, lessons and activities that adult educators can use to integrate clean energy concepts into their curricula."

It would be great to hear additional tips and words of wisdom from our Massachusetts colleagues about focusing on clean energy careers. I'm thinking a lot about the need for clean energy this week since the heat index is 108 degrees today!

Cheers, Susan Finn Miller

Moderator, Teaching & Learning CoP

Comments

Kirti Venkatasawmy's picture
First

Dear LINCS Colleagues,

My school plans to offer an IET program in Advanced Manufacturing. I will be involved in the development of curriculum for the Adult Education & Literacy and Workforce Preparation components. Have any of you had experience with advanced manufacturing? I haven’t met with the technical instructor yet, so at this stage I am trying to gather as much information and resources as possible.

Thank you,
Kirti

Paul Jurmo's picture
Ten

It is great that LINCS continues to provide.a forum for educators and other stakeholders to share ideas and information related to work-related basic education (and related areas such as IET, career pathways, etc.). In the case of advanced manufacturing, the National Workplace Literacy Program of the US Department of Education funded a series of three-year pilot projects in which adult educators worked with employers and unions to develop customized curricula, implement and fine-tune them, and then document the lessons learned for others to build on.  These pilots included field testing of reading, math, and other basic skills (e.g., team problem-solving) activities in manufacturing companies that were adopting new technologies and work processes that required workers to possess such skills.  

At one point, reports from such projects were reviewed, summarized, and made available in the LINCS workforce collection and, earlier, at Ohio State University.  Are such resources still being made available to our field (both on-line and through training and mentoring systems), so we can build on prior work rather than have to continually start from scratch?

In addition to the NWLP, federal and private funds have, over the past two decades, supported the development of education for green jobs and other industry career pathways.  Are the lessons learned, curricula, and other resources generated by those projects being made easily accessible to educators, employers, labor unions, public policy makers, and other stakeholders (via an updated and comprehensive clearinghouse/resource center such as LINCS)?  

Paul Jurmo.                                                                                                      www.pauljurmo.info

Michael Cruse's picture
One hundred

Hi, Paul-

Thanks for your post, and drawing our attention to previous resources on work-related basic education, including IET.  Do you have a list of these resources by name, or authoring agency? They may be within the LINCS Resource Collection, or hosted by other systems with DOL, or other cooperating institutions.

I’d be glad to talk with you more about what you’re looking for, and tracking these down if they’re still available. LINCS has a review process for items to be considered for the Resource Collection, and I’m happy to talk with you, and others, about suggesting new materials that we can all benefit from having access to as part of the community.

Best, 

Mike Cruse

michaelcruse74@gmail.com

Michael Cruse's picture
One hundred

Hi, Kirti -

Thanks for your post. Would you tell us more about the type of advanced manufacturing you’re planning to prepare your students for in the future? I ask this after reading more about careers in supply chain management. Supply Chain Management is a field that currently has, and continues to show, many career opportunities at different educational levels, similar to advanced manufacturing.  This link connects to a website that provides information on related careers, their education levels, and employment outlook. Is this the type of general information you’re looking for on a wide variety of jobs in the advanced manufacturing field, or do you want to find more in-depth information about a specific type of manufacturing, and for specific jobs within that manufacturing process?

Best,

Mike Cruse

Kirti Venkatasawmy's picture
First

Hi Mike,

Thank you for the Supply Chain Management link. It provides a great overview of this field.

I wish I knew the type of advanced manufacturing the school is planning to focus on. As soon as I meet with the CTE instructor and the administrator, I will be able to ask focused questions. Until then, I would like to find in-depth information for each type of manufacturing and the jobs associated within each type.

Happy 4th!

Kirti

 

 

Michael Cruse's picture
One hundred

Hi, Kirti-

Happy 4th to you too! Looking at all manufacturing, and all associated jobs is a big task. I’d suggested using ONET to find the names, task descriptions, education levels, and employment projections. You can also contact the American Manufacturers’ Association, to learn more about the field, and gather information for your meeting with the CTE instructor and administrator.

Good luck, and please keep us posted on your progress, and any other questions along the way.

Best,

Mike

 

 

 

Kirti Venkatasawmy's picture
First

Hello Mike,

Thank you for suggesting Onet and the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM). Through my own research, I found another site to explore-- the Manufacturing Institute. These sites are a good starting point. If you happen to come across the pilot projects reports that Paul Jurmo referenced in an earlier post, would you please share them with us?

Again, many thanks for your guidance.

Kirti

Michael Cruse's picture
One hundred

Hi, Kirti -

That’s another great resource.  I’ve been in touch with Paul, and hopefully we can add some additional resources to those already available in the Resource Collection.  Stay tuned...

Best,

Mike

Michael Cruse's picture
One hundred

This may not directly address the topic here, but I think it still has value to the community.  If you know someone who qualifies, pass this along. If not, but you work in a program near an HBCU, share your interest in working with their students who’re completing degrees in the clean energy field.  Lastly, follow the stories of the inaugural class to learn more about their work, and career aspirations, to share as inspiration with your learners.

Best,

Mike Cruse               

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Clean Energy Initiative

Expanding the Baltimore Solar Initiative to HBCU Campuses and Communities

Regional Roundtable Discussion

Wednesday, July 25, 2018 

Morgan State University

Earl Richardson Library Boardroom

1700 E Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore, MD 21251

11:00AM – 1:00PM

 Registration: Email – hbcucleanenergycoalition@gmail.com

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (WHIHBCU) is excited to announce the launch of HBCU Competitiveness Scholars, a student recognition program designed to honor current HBCU students for their competitiveness, i.e., successfully preparing to compete for top opportunities that improve standards of living in their communities. For the specified academic school year, Scholars will serve as representatives of their respective institutions and communities to the WHIHBCU. The WHIHBCU will provide outreach and engagement opportunities for Scholars as well as information and resources to disseminate among their fellow students. Scholars will participate in regional events, webinars, and monthly web chats with the WHIHBCU staff and other professionals from a wide range of disciplines.  Scholars also will have opportunities to engage with one another to showcase individual and collective talent across the HBCU spectrum.

The President or Chancellor will determine the nominee from their institution. The WHIHBCU will accept no more than one nominee per school. Although each HBCU is allowed one (1) nominee, institutions may appeal to the WHIHBCU for one (1) additional nominee. The WHIHBCU will work with the President or Chancellor on a case-by-case basis to review, approve or deny each appeal. The HBCU Competitiveness Scholar nomination form must be submitted and endorsed by the President, Chancellor or designated surrogate. The WHIHBCU will electronically collect nominations and narrative responses. 

More information on how to apply and eligibility are attached and can be found HERE  All nomination forms must be to: hbcuscholars@ed.gov no later than July 31, 2018.

NOMINATE YOUR COMPETITIVENESS SCHOLAR TODAY! 

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities

 

Michael Cruse's picture
One hundred

I want to share another model for IET focusing on green energy, and careers, from south of the Mason-Dixon Line.  In Baltimore, MD, Civic Works Center for Green Careers offers several tracks for adult learners interested in earning their GED, and job training in in-demand careers, from solar to brownfield remediation.  Check out Civic Works’ website for more information, and let me know if you have any questions for staff.  I’ll be happy to pass them along and share their response with you.

Best,  

Mike Cruse

Career Pathways Moderator

michaelcruse74@gmail.com

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